Lifetime won’t change Project Runway’s format, timeslot; will pay $1 million an episode

This week’s biggest news was Project Runway‘s surprising move from Bravo to Lifetime. Besides learning that Lifetime also bought a Runway spin-off and the reasons behind the move, other details have come out this week. A round-up of other news about the move:

  • Lifetime president Susanne Daniels said the show “will look exactly the same” after it moves, according to the New York Post. She said it will air “in the same time slot and the same day. We’re not going to fix what’s not broken about it.”
  • The New York Post also reported that “Bravo paid around $600,000 per episode for the next two seasons of ‘Project Runway’ but less than that during the first three,” and “Weinstein … considered the per episode price to be a low-ball figure.” For the rights to air the show, “Lifetime is paying more than $1 million per episode, or at least $400,000 more than Bravo was paying,” the paper said.
  • Blogging Bravo VP Andy Cohen calls the move “hoohah,” but refuses to say much more: “…I have to acknowledge all the PROJECT RUNWAY hoohah you’ve all no doubt been reading about for the past day. There’s not much I can say except that all of us at Bravo poured our hearts and souls into the show and we love it dearly. I can’t say anything more than that for now,” he wrote at BravoTV.com, the web site he’ll only be able to plug during one more badly hosted reunion show.
  • The move could affect product placement on the show. Advertising Age reports that “a sponsorship war could be afoot as well. Because Weinstein Co. owns the rights to the show, all the negotiations for the show’s sponsorships go through the company, not the network” and “come November, the network switcheroo — if it goes through — effectively puts into play all of those sponsorships, several of which have remained intact since the inception.” However, “a Bravo spokesperson confirmed all of Season Four’s integrated sponsors — Elle Magazine, L’Oreal Paris, Alberto-Culver’s Tresemme, Saturn and Bluefly.com — will be returning for Season Five.”
Remodeling Job and It’s My Project [New York Post]
Housewives En Fuego [Bravo]
‘Project Runway’ Sponsorships Could Unravel With Network Shift [Advertising Age]

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.