Christian needs surgery for a ruptured tendon but will stay on the show

Dancing with the Stars 6 contestant Cristián de la Fuente needs surgery for the injury he sustained during Monday’s performance, but he will stay in the competition, as he revealed during Tuesday’s results show.

The show used his injury as a teaser all night, as Christián was there, but no one addressed how he was doing. At one point, Tom Bergeron even said, “Who will suffer the worst pain of all? Elimination.” Yeah, being eliminated from a competition that has no prize is much worse than having a muscle torn apart.

Tom and Samantha–whose hair was kind of crazy and bigger than usual, and seemed to change throughout the episode, like she was taking naps on the floor and just standing up to talk–continued with the results and the time-wasting like always, and toward the end of the show, with four couples left, called Christián and Cheryl down.

“I ruptured the tendon of my bicep,” Christián said. “I need surgery in order to put it back together. … I just talked to the doctor five minutes ago, and he said that he can delay the surgery, and if people voted for us and they want us to be on the show, I would like to be there and not give up.” The people did indeed vote for him to stay, and sent Shannon Elizabeth home.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.