Step it Up and Dance competition debuts on Bravo tonight, following Supermodel finale

Tonight, Bravo debuts yet another talent-focused competitive reality series, bringing their total of Project Runway clones to six. Step it Up and Dance debuts at 11, a dance competition that, unlike some of the other clones, will actually be produced by Runway‘s producers.

The show follows “12 dancers chosen from around the country, as they master every conceivable dance style, from ballet and ballroom to Broadway and burlesque,” and compete for $100,000, according to the network. It debuts at 11 p.m. ET, following the conclusion of Make me a Supermodel, which, with wooden and boring hosts Nikki Taylor and Tyson Beckford announcing the winners, should be about as dramatic as staring at a tree trunk. Speaking of hosts, Elizabeth Berkley will host the dance competition, and hopefully will be better than, like, every other host Bravo has found over the past few years.

Both she and former Saved by the Bell co-star Mario Lopez are now hosting dance competitions (he hosted MTV’s America’s Best Dance Crew). “It just kind of makes perfect sense, because we both have always shared a great love for dance. In our kind of culture at this time, dance is being embraced, which is such a great, great joy,” she told reporters, according to The Boston Herald.

Step it Up and Dance [Bravo]
‘Dance’ fever [Boston Herald]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.