Adam and Ryan are Big Brother 9′s final two

Yet again, Big Brother will end with an obnoxious ass as its winner–keeping up its history of rewarding people with bad or bigoted behavior–as the final two contestants are Adam Jasinski and Ryan Quicksall.

Here’s a quick refresher: Adam was fired from his job and caused an advertiser to bail from the show over a comment he made about autistic children earlier this season. And Ryan was accused of being a racist by his own girlfriend, and who admitted to having a problem with interracial relationships even though he thinks that does not qualify as racism. (“I just said you didn’t agree with interracial relationships,” Jen told Ryan, and he replied, “You didn’t say I was racist and prejudiced?”)

To be fair, both of those comments came early in the season, and while I haven’t exactly been paying close attention, they don’t seem to have repeated this kind of offensive stuff–beyond, you know, just being typical Big Brother assholes. They’re nothing like mush-mouthed bigot Amber or uber-dick Dick from last season, and perhaps not even as bad as cruel idiot Joshuah would have been. Still, they’re not exactly the kind of people the world rallies behind, although some people are enamored by Adam.

The show arrived at its final two by dumping half its cast into the jury house over the past two nights. On Tuesday, the show had a fake live eviction show (it was pre-taped), during which Adam and Ryan conspired to and actually got rid of Sharon, and then the final three began the last HOH competition. Last night, Sheila and Adam quit round one of that contest and gave it to Ryan; Adam and Sheila got into a giant hamster wheel for part two and Adam won; Ryan won part three, the ridiculously unfair random questions round; he evicted Sheila; and then Sheila fake-cried her way through her interview with Julie (seriously: no tears and bad acting). Perhaps the only bright spot was that this disaster of a season ends Sunday.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.