Adam wins Big Brother 9, pledges $100,000 to the organization that (he doesn’t know) fired him

Big Brother 9 is over, and the man who seemed like he would be voted out on day one has won the show’s $500,000 prize. Adam Jasinski won and pledged $100,000 of that money to the organization that fired him, although of course he has no idea that he was fired or that calling autistic kids “retards” was the news-making event of the season.

After he won and exited the house, Adam said something like, “I’ll give it to the United Autism Foundation, $100,000 to help these children’s after school program.” During the jury Q&A, Adam said, “bottom line, I’ll help children, I’ll change lives; that’s why I’m on the show, period.” It’s almost enough to feel sorry for him, as he has no idea about the fallout from his stupidly chosen words. But words have consequences, and calling kids that name wasn’t the only offensive thing he said.

During the live finale, James was nearly silent, Joshuah was as inarticulate as usual (and so were the others; Chelsia said, “as who is a hatred person” at one point), and the live studio audience was full of hyper extras and loser Big Brother cast members who’ve discovered that once out of the house, they have nothing left to do but make appearances on the show (hello, Dick, Daniele, Eric, and Janelle, plus Amber, Bunky, and others). Those extras high-fived the jury members and made them feel like the public gives two shits about them, so their reality check today will be a lot more fascinating than what happened last night–although Julie Chen managed to function with both hands full, as she had a microphone in one hand and cards in the other during one segment, perhaps the most impressive part of the whole hour. Clearly, the show needs to make some crucial changes ASAP.

The jury was particularly bitter, which was only surprising because they somehow seemed like they were obviously superior to the people that had beaten them. The only grounded person was James, who didn’t seem bitter at all. And when he cast his vote, he said, “I hope you party away this money.” Speaking of money, James won’t have to make out with and go down on guys to make money any time soon, as he won the $25,000 favorite jury member prize. Sheila was the runner up.

Although there was screaming and anger and hurt feelings during the jury Q&A, not actually caring about the jury members or finalists made the whole thing seemed pretty flat to me. The whole time, it seemed that Ryan would win; although he stabbed jury members in the back, they respected him for his game play rather than Adam’s avoidance of the dirtier parts of the game.

Ultimately, the entire jury except one voted for Adam. Matt, Natalie, Sharon, Sheila, Chelsia, and James voted for Adam, and Ryan received only Joshuah’s vote. That was odd because, at one point, Joshuah asked Athum a question, Athum responded with hostility, and Joshuah said, “Screaming at the TV screen is not going to help you any you know get anys or you need to talk us with respect or with screaming so quit doing right that off the bat, k?”

Oh, Joshuah, if you get a job on TV, I’m going to walk into traffic and hope my experience playing Frogger doesn’t pay off.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.