Lauren Conrad says producers have “kind of talked about” a Hills movie

The star of The Hills says producers have at least discussed the idea of a movie version of the quasi-reality series. “We have kind of talked about it, but I don’t know how far that would ever go,” Lauren Conrad told MTV.

Unlike the forthcoming film adaptation of Ice Road Truckers, which will become an action movie, this movie would be little more than an extended episode.

“I think if they were going to do a film of ‘The Hills’ they would basically film it like we do the show and they would just have to kind of edit it into a movie; it would be like a really long episode, I’d imagine,” Lauren said.

In unrelated news, earlier this week Lauren disputed an Us Weekly cover story on her MySpace blog, saying that the “How I Was Stabbed in the Back” cover story had “headlines that, in no way, represent my words or feelings. I do not feel betrayed by Audrina or Brody. I love them both and said nothing to contradict this. I understand that headlines sell magazines, but I value my friendships above magazine sales any day.”

Being a smart media whore, she also makes sure to say she’s not criticizing the people she’s criticizing. “It is not my intention to criticize Us Weekly as I have a great relationship with them,” Lauren wrote.

Lauren Conrad Says A ‘Hills’ Movie Has Been Discussed [MTV]
Lauren Conrad: How Audrina and Brody Betrayed Me [Us Weekly]
Clearing things up…… [MySpace]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.