Celebrity Rehab’s finale airs tonight; it’s the best and most tragic show of the year

The two-hour finale of VH1’s Celebrity Rehab officially debuts tonight at 9 p.m. ET, when the celebrities go on an Outward Bound experience together before leaving rehab. A mini-marathon precedes that, starting at 6.

I’ve found the show to be exceptionally compelling–and the best new reality show of 2008. The problem is that because there’s so much rawness and depth, it’s sometimes simultaneously hard to watch and impossible to turn away from, and thus doesn’t make good fodder for recapping or writing about.

Its premise suggested otherwise: a bunch of former reality star quasi-celebs in rehab? Led by radio show host Dr. Drew? That is a proven failure? Ridiculous. Instead, it’s turned out to be an extremely thoughtful documentary, essentially, showing unflinchingly what it’s like to be addicted to drugs. We end up rooting for the celebrities to stay sober, even though their antics while high would be far more entertaining.

It’s unlike other series because of how, well, real it actually is. The show’s willingness to essentially ignore the fourth wall is key. Early on, some of the celebrities expressed irritation with the cameras’ constant presence, and the editors showed footage of a sound engineer fixing someone’s mic and interrupting the conversation. By not ignoring the production, the producers legitimized their own show, which is first and foremost about people genuinely trying to get off drugs.

The cast was also well-chosen, providing both an interesting mix of personalities and different approaches and responses to sobriety. At first, Dr. Drew seemed more interested in giving condescending lectures (as usual) than being a doctor to his patients. But after having to show up in the middle of the night a few times, his persona dissolved and he loosened up. The other celebrities, too, opened up to each other, us, and themselves.

During one episodes, Crazy Town singer Seth “Shifty” Binzer talked to his son, Halo, on the phone, and told him that he was getting help. And we heard Halo say to someone on the other end of the phone, “He says he’s gonna stop doing bad things!” It was such a devastating moment that it was almost comic relieve to see Jeff Conaway’s delusional, co-dependent girlfriend Vikki Lizzi show up with drugs and alcohol, and then attempt to rationalize her ridiculous behavior. But as easy as she is to hate on, even that, too, was sad. I’d hope for a second season if only the series wasn’t ultimately so tragic.

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.