Viewers don’t want to buy Amanda Overmeyer’s concert tickets

Tuesday night, rocker Amanda Overmeyer stood in front of the studio audience in rock-star victory after declaring that she was just trying to show her fans what kind of performance they’d see. “Your tickets aren’t on sale yet,” Simon Cowell told her, and viewers agreed, sending her home last night and keeping her out of American Idol 7‘s top 10.

She was joined by Carly Smithson and Kristy Lee Cook in the bottom three, but it seemed as though Amanda knew she was going home, as Ryan Seacrest held the voting results relatively close to her, and she was pretty obviously reading them while he was stalling. After he sent Carly to safety, Amanda said something to Kristy Lee Cook like, “I’m going home.”

There is one good thing that will come from her elimination: she won’t have to sing whatever terrible song gets chosen for the finalists to perform this year. On Tuesday, when Simon Cowell insisted Amanda’s was becoming boring, she said, “ballads are boring.” She’s right, but Ryan Seacrest announced last night that the show is resurrecting the songwriting contest, which produced the most pathetically awful crapass song I heard last year, “This is My Now.”

Last night’s results show killed time with Kellie Pickler, a segment showing Elliot Yamin and Fantasia traveling to Angola to deliver malaria-preventing nets funded by Idol Gives Back, and another viewer Q&A. That segment didn’t even try to pretend that it had been pre-taped and wasn’t live, as all the finalists were sitting on the couches together, even though only a few had been sent to safety by that point–and even they were sitting in different places on the couches. During it, the judges were asked if they’d ever resurrect their season two kiss, and Simon Cowell gave the night its most surprising moment by telling Paula Abdul, “You’re actually a very good kisser.”

American Idol Songwriter 2008: Home [Fox]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.