The Hills’ Lauren and Whitney working for PR firm

After quitting their jobs at Teen Vogue, The Hills‘ stars have found a new job: they’re working for a PR agency.

After Lauren Conrad and Whitney Port were rumored to be showing up at a Fashion Week show, New York Magazine confirmed that they were there, but not to work in fashion. Instead, “They’re working for fashion PR madhouse People’s Revolution,” and reported “that they’re working for a number of labels.”

Meanwhile, in other Hills off-season news, Entourage’s “Kevin Connolly struck out with the dimmest of the MTV reality bulbs — Audrina Patridge — at Playboy’s Super Saturday Night party,” according to Rush & Molloy. “After being denied a date, he offered to make the “Hills” star dinner at her apartment — and got another ‘no.'” Then, he “moved right on to Kristin Cavallari — literally — at the House of Hennessy party. The two grinded on the dance floor until they noticed a looming photog and split. They later came back together in a quiet corner of the room.”

Exclusive: ‘Hills’ Girls Lauren and Whitney Working for People’s Revolution [New York Magazine]
Side Dish: Celebs’ primary picks [Rush & Molloy]

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.