Bravo needs to cut its rapid-fire edits

On last night’s Make Me a Supermodel, the models were asked to strip naked and pose for art students. It wasn’t exactly an original challenge–hell, most of the challenges on this show seem to have been done before on shows from Top Model to the super-contrived Janice Dickinson Modeling Agency. That Oxygen show has long shown the model’s bare asses, and Bravo decided to go that route last night, the first time I can remember seeing any uncensored nudity on the network.

Many of the challenges–from swimwear on the runway to the “chemistry” shoot last week that allowed the models to roll around with each other, in bed, in their underwear–seem designed to get the models to strip down as much as possible. There is nothing wrong with this; hell, more reality shows could use hot people taking off their clothes.

But last night, the editors refused to show anything for more than a fraction of a section. After all the set-up and worrying from some models, we just saw them from mostly obstructed viewpoints for a couple seconds each, often combined with some moving camera work. On some level, Project Runway and Top Chef do this, too, cutting constantly so it’s hard to really see and focus on the clothing or food. Why such a lack of attention on the most important stuff?

In other words, Bravo, stop with the rapid-fire cuts on those things we actually want to see, especially naked people. And let’s be honest: The models on Make Me a Supermodel are not taking off their clothes every few minutes for anything but the fact that it makes good TV, so you might as well linger a little bit. It doesn’t have to become porn, but if you’re going to have the models strip, actually let us see the result.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.