Ferras’ “Hollywood’s Not America” selected as American Idol 7’s exit song

The song that plays as people cry their way home on this week’s Hollywood auditions round has been selected, and it’s by a 25-year-old singer-songwriter named Ferras. His single “Hollywood’s Not America,” from his forthcoming debut album Aliens & Rainbows, has been selected by the sohw’s producers, and “plays as the ‘Idol’ contestants are dismissed from the Hollywood tryouts,” Billboard reports.

However, it’s unclear if his song will also be used for the rest of the season. Entertainment Weekly compares it to Daniel Powter’s “Bad Day,” the song that was overplayed during season five, but like Billboard, the magazine qualifies the selection by saying the song is “the exit music for contestants who will be booted off during season 7’s Hollywood Week.”

“Hollywood’s Not America” “was co-written with the Matrix’s Lauren Christy,” according to Billboard. Ferras said, “I was sitting down writing one night with Lauren, drinking wine and talking about Hollywood — how people come here to achieve dreams, and you realize at one point that it’s never going to be enough. When you get to that point, you realize, ‘I love myself, I love who I am, I don’t need all these things.’ I don’t want to be preachy in the song — it’s just an observation. People ask me, ‘Do you even like L.A.?’ And yes, I love it.”

“Idol” farewell song a beginning for young songwriter [Billboard]
Ferras [MySpace]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.