Survivor Micronesia is “superfans” versus all-star “favorites”

The 16th season of Survivor will not be a true all-star season, as has been rumored. Instead, as Jeff Probst reported during the live reunion show, Survivor Micronesia will be subtitled “Fans vs. Favorites,” and will feature “superfans” battling against a group of all-star favorites.

“Now, a select few will get their chance at the adventure of a lifetime. What they don’t know is that they’ll be playing against the ultimate competitors, favorite castaways from the past,” Probst said. He also said that one of the Survivor China cast members would appear; cast rumors suggested two people, Courtney and James, would appear on the all-star season.

This is an intriguing and unexpected concept, one that avoids the pitfalls of an all-star season and forces new types of strategies to emerge. However, the fan players we were introduced to seemed to be ridiculously overeager and not-very-Survivor-like in their introductory videos, which hopefully were just a bad representation of the new cast members.

The reported location for the next season, Palau, is apparently accurate, as Palau is part of Micronesia. The series has similarly used different names for seasons set in the same location in the past, referring, for example, to the three seasons set in Panama as Survivor Pearl Islands, Survivor All-Stars, and Survivor Panama.

Survivor Micronesia: Fans vs. Favorites debuts Feb. 7 at 8 p.m. ET. Here’s the preview that aired last night:

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.