Project Runway 4 designers participate in fashion show

The 15 designers who will compete during Project Runway 4 starting next week introduced their work to the public with a runway show at Lincoln Center yesterday.

They “sent three signature looks down the runway” and “showcased some of the looks that earned them a ticket into the competition, including bejeweled dresses, fringed leggings, bouncing bustles and sweeping gowns,” USA TODAY reports.

Tim Gunn said that they want to “have a real competition” with the designers, who have professional experience. “Once we have a really seasoned, experienced professional designer (on the show), unless we tried to have an even playing field, we have unfair advantages. This is a very even playing field as we start out. And as we progress, watch what happens,” he said.

Santino Rice attended and said he was impressed by “Rami Kashou, 31, who already counts Paris Hilton, Jessica Simpson and Jennifer Lopez as clients,” according to the paper. “Early crowd-pleasers also included costume designer Chris March, 44, and Ricky Lizalde, 35, who has designed lingerie for Oscar de la Renta and now has his own line, Lizalde, in major department stores.”

‘Runway’ rolls out a Season 4 preview [USA TODAY]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.