New Mexico drops its Kid Nation investigation; second season may not happen

The New Mexico Attorney General’s Office began investigating CBS’ Kid Nation in late August, but after looking into “the permit process, the 22-page contract between producers and parents, and whether the production company illegally refused to allow inspectors onto the property, officials now say they have dropped the matter,” Los Angeles Times reports.

A statement from that office to the newspaper doesn’t, however, exonerate the show, it simply says that it won’t proceed due to a lack of formal complaints. “It has been determined that absent any formal complaints to this office or request for investigation by any state agency, the Attorney General’s Office will not pursue any further inquiry into the ‘Kid Nation’ production in New Mexico,” the statement said.

Meanwhile, CBS has been casting for Kid Nation 2, but the show has not yet been officially renewed. “A CBS spokesman said the network has not decided if it will produce another season, but ‘there has been casting and other preproduction activity so the show would be ready in the event of a pick-up,” the paper reports. The network typically opens casting for its reality shows, such as Survivor and The Amazing Race, before a show gets renewed.

New Mexico drops ‘Kid Nation’ probe [Los Angeles Times]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.