Dog the Bounty Hunter says his use of the n-word is “not a degrading thing at all”

Duane “Dog” Chapman, the star of Dog the Bounty Hunter, gave his first interview last night following the release of his racist rant by his son.

Dog says he’d only use the n-word “only probably as a greeting to a black person where they’d come up, ‘Hey, my N-dog.’ And I’d be like, stick my head in his chest, ‘Hi, man, how are you doing?’ I wouldn’t turn around and say, ‘Hi,’ and use it out loud, because I’m going to get beat up, but I used it as a — when I meet a brother, and we shake, and we say, ‘How’s it,’ that’s how it is. It’s not a degrading thing at all,” he said on FOX News’ Hannity & Colmes.

As a result, “But when a brother says that to you first or you realize that there’s — there’s a special connection that I thought I had between me and black America. And I used to say, ‘I’m black, too.’ In other words, I — my whole life I’ve been called a half-breed, a convict, king of the trailer trash, this and that. I take that and stand. … I now learned I’m not black at all. And I never did it out of hate. This sounds so stupid. I always did it out of love. Other white guys would be like, ‘Boy, who does Dog think he is? Dog can say that.’ And black guys would be with me and walk with me and respect me.”

He repeated his apologies, and said, ‘If I could kill myself and people would forgive me, I would do that. … There is no excuse. I am guilty, and I will take my punishment. But the end of what I said is I will do everything there is in my power to make sure people have forgiven me. I will not stop until they say, ‘Dog has been forgiven.'”

Exclusive Interview With Duane ‘Dog’ Chapman [FOX News]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.