Hills fakes scenes with Heidi and Spencer at LAX

Earlier this week, the executive producer of The Hills revealed that the show is “a little fake” because of the way they schedule what to shoot. But scenes shot today in Los Angeles suggest that the series stretches reality a bit more than that.

Photos taken by Pacific Coast News at LAX on Wednesday show Spencer dropping Heidi off at the airport, and then picking her up again, when they embrace as if she’s been away. “The couple changed their shirts but they’re wearing the same pants and shoes in each scene,” Celebslam reports.

If this was a scripted show, those might be pick-up shots, which are filmed well after a scene has been shot and used to fill in gaps. While this could be used as evidence that the entire show is scripted and fake, it also could be less sinister. Perhaps Heidi really went on a trip, but the producers didn’t get film of her going or leaving, so they had the two show up today. If that’s the case, do these shots change that reality? Are they even necessary? Is it deception to shoot those two scenes on the same day, or just a shortcut that will make the show more narratively interesting? Or am I just over-thinking something involving Heidi and Spencer, for crying out loud?

The Hills is definitely fake [Celebslam]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.