WGA: Variety’s claim that they’re done unionizing reality workers is “patently false”

The WGAw has responded to Variety’s assertion that the guild has given up trying to unionize reality show writers, saying in an e.mail message that the paper’s story is “patently false.”

Patric M. Verrone, the president of the WGAw, wrote (Defamer has the full e.mail message) that the story “makes a number of baseless assertions, including that our reality organizing campaign has ended and that WGA negotiators in our current MBA bargaining have decided to drop our reality proposal. I am writing to assure you that these assertions are patently false.”

He says that “much of this article was based on [the reporter, Dave McNary's] own analysis and speculation rather than objective fact. The Guild intends to make clear to Variety’s editors that opinions should be labeled as such, and not printed on the front page under a banner headline. The WGAW continues to be committed to organizing reality.”

The message cites some of their current efforts to unionize reality programming, and Verrone writes, “I cannot guarantee you that we will achieve all of our goals at the bargaining table, or that our reality television organizing campaign will meet with rapid success; but I can give you my word that this Variety article does not represent the position of the WGAW or our Negotiating Committee.”

The WGA Fires Back At Variety, Says It’s Not Giving Up On Reality [Defamer]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.