Sabrina Bryan voted off Dancing with the Stars in “an outrage and an upset”

In a major upset, Sabrina Bryan was eliminated from Dancing with the Stars 5, despite being one of, if not the, best dancers.

People calls this “possibly the biggest upset in the show’s history,” but Sabrina told the magazine, “I’m not bitter. I’ve made some great friendships here and I’ve had the best time. This was an amazing opportunity for me and I feel so lucky to have gone this far.”

Carrie Ann Inaba was more upset, telling the magazine, “This is an outrage and an upset. It’s so disappointing and heartbreaking, not to mention complete shock. How do you explain Sabrina leaving? She’s been at the top of the leader board from week one. Everyone assumed she’d be in the finale.”

And dancer Anna Trebunskaya said, “It’s a big shock and a big loss for the show. She was one of the best performers on the show ever. I think the show might suffer a little bit because the level of dancing will go down. It’s so sad that America didn’t vote for the best dancer. She was so clearly the best.”

Cameron Mathison was also in the bottom two, despite having one of the higher scores Monday; the two lowest scoring celebrities, Jane Seymour (who was absent due to food poisoning) and Marie Osmond were both safe.

A Stunned Sabrina Bryan Leaves Dancing [People]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.