American Idol tour fined $5,000 for 16 child labor law violations involving Sanjaya, Jordin

The company that produced the American Idol 6 tour has been fined $5,000 for 16 violations of New York’s child labor laws. 19 Entertainment’s tour division “failed to get the proper permits to hire and feature” two underage finalists, the New York Daily News reports exclusively.

The two performers were season six winner Jordan Sparks and sixth-season joke Sanjaya Malakar, who “turned 18 on Sept. 10 but was 17 during the New York tour dates,” according to the paper.

This is “first [settlement] under the New York State Child Performer Labor Law,” the Daily News reports. It “requires employers who use child performers to register with the state so they can be monitored as to whether they’re complying with child labor, education and workers’ compensation regulations” and “mandates that at least 15% of what children earn goes into a trust fund where it is held for them until they turn 18.”

A Labor Department spokesperson said that even though the whole Idol-watching world knew Sanjaya and Jordin were minors last season, the investigation started only after “[o]ne of our clerical staff — who was actually a fan of the show — [heard] that these performers were, in fact, under 18, and so she did some digging and referred that over to our investigators.”

Tour firm slammed over underage ‘American Idols’ [New York Daily News]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.