Big Brother producer Allison Grodner says Dick’s coded letter, behavior is okay

Big Brother 8 executive producer Allison Grodner has previously admitted to making up the show’s rules as they go along, and now she says that Dick Donato’s coded letter from his son did not violate the show’s rules. Hey, at least she’s honest.

Entertainment Weekly reports in its Sept. 21 issue that “producers don’t think he’s done anything to compromise the game.” The article, which is not yet online, quotes Grodner, who says, “BB is a microcosm of society. When you put these people together, we’re bound to see extreme behavior. Personally, I don’t like their views, but this is what this social experiment is all about.”

In an online column, the magazine’s Lynette Rice reiterates that Grodner says his contact with the outside world was fine. “In a surprising interview Monday, executive producer Allison Grodner told me that while houseguests occasionally find loopholes in the game, Dick did not compromise the outcome by accepting the coded letter from Vincent. … Still, it’s disconcerting to know that Dick can openly admit to cheating and still escape any sort of punishment. When Jen went off the slop, she got slapped with a big fat penalty vote. Why does Dick get a big fat pass so he can skate into the finale?”

Perhaps because Jen didn’t have an estranged daughter in the house with whom she could reconcile and make for television with ever-increasing ratings?

Donatos Pass Go [Entertainment Weekly]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.