Dick: “I went after everyone. It has nothing to do with sex!”; “Jen came after me”

Big Brother 8 is over, Dick won, and now all that’s left is to pretend the season never happened. But first, the contestants have to do a bunch of interviews where they answer the same questions over and over again.

CBS cancelled interviews out of fear for what journalists would ask, and ironically, once given the chance, some journalists are now basically hurling softballs. For example, I’ve yet to see anyone actually ask Amber about her anti-Semitic tirade, but then again, maybe no one cares about Amber. (In this interview, for example, a reporter from CBS 2 asks her probing questions about crying and being “too trusting.” What an asshole, and not Amber.)

But some people did ask good questions, and Dick gives a perhaps predictable answer most of the time: it was strategy and/or he doesn’t care what people think. Entertainment Weekly asked Dick about being “unrelentingly cruel to Jen,” and he said,

“I can’t stand Jen. I look at her as just a horrible person, and I had no problem calling her out on all of her bulls—. I’ve never met anyone so self-absorbed in my life, and who treats everyone like they’re not just below her but they’re not even worth her time. The fact of the matter was, she’s a friggin’ nanny. Give me a break. … I don’t know what they showed on the show, but it was nonstop with that girl. Every single conversation, she would turn around to herself. She wouldn’t be included in conversations, and she would answer people’s questions that were posed to other people.”

ASAP’s The Slug told Dick that “viewers called some of your remarks sexist, homophobic and racist,” and Dick said,

“Hell week, as I like to call it, was the second time Daniele and I were on the block together. The entire house had turned against us for trying to get Eric out of the house. Dustin’s comment “How’s the house gonna be with your daughter gone?” kinda sent things home with me that I needed to do what I needed to do to keep Daniele in the game and push her forward. I was more than willing to get evicted by my actions. I had to make everyone in that house hate me with such a passion. The personal had to outweigh the strategic. I did what I had to do. Anybody who doesn’t like it, oh well. The same people I made comments about voted for me to win the game.”

The Slug also asked Dick about whether or not he should have been kicked out for the coded letter or cigarette confrontation with Jen, and he said,

“Jen came after me. I blew smoke in her face, but she came after me. Oh well. If I would’ve done that to her and had been swinging around her head, you can bet that I would’ve been kicked out of the game. It wasn’t even talked about. It wasn’t even mentioned. If the situation was reversed and I did that, I would’ve been in the Diary Room, and there would’ve been major, major problems. But not one thing was said about it. All that was brought up was that she ate when she was supposed to be on slop. As far as the coded letter, it was something Vince and I had talked it. There was nothing really in there. And by the time the letter even arrived, it was five weeks after the fact and wouldn’t have mattered, anyway.”

Midseasonreplacements interviewed Dick and Daniele, and engaged Dick about his game play and rationalization of that. Most significantly, Dick insists that he was an equal-opportunity offender:

“I verbally abused Zach for hours. For you to say it’s towards one sex or the other. Dude, seriously, that’s bullshit. I went after Dustin. I went after Eric. I went after everyone. It has nothing to do with sex! I went after every single person in that house at one point or another. It has nothing to do with their sex, their race, their religion.”

Donato Mess With Us! [Entertainment Weekly]
Chatting with the Donatos from “Big Brother 8″ [ASAP]
Midseasonreplacements Interviews Dick and Daniele [Midseasonreplacements]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.