Big Brother ratings up; CBS won’t air Amber’s “offensive” anti-Semitic remarks

America’s Player Eric is still in the house after the show’s highest-rated episode this summer, which was watched by 8.03 million viewers. That means the show’s text message generating houseguest and Jewish cast member won’t be doing the rounds with the media following revelations about Amber Siyavus Tomcavage’s anti-Semitic comments.

Those comments weren’t even mentioned on last night’s episode. But CBS did issue a statement that basically restated former executive producer Arnold Shapiro’s position that negative comments would not be broadcast on television (just like moments of bigotry from the seven previous seasons). In a statement about her remarks to TMZ, CBS said:

“BIG BROTHER is a reality show about watching a group of people who have no privacy 24/7 – and seeing every moment of their lives. At times, the Houseguests reveal prejudices and other beliefs that we do not condone. We certainly find the statements made by Amber Siyavus on the live Internet feed to be offensive and they will not be part of any future broadcast on the CBS Television Network.

Any views or opinions expressed in personal commentary by a Houseguest appearing on BIG BROTHER 8, either on any live feed from the House or the broadcast, are those of the individual(s) speaking and do not represent the views or opinions of CBS or the producers of the program.”

I suppose that means we won’t see Dick calling Amber a “fag hag” and Jameka “a fucking cunt” during a confrontation Friday, or Eric calling Jen a “cunt”, or any of the other terrible things these houseguests say.

CBS may not publicly humiliate the houseguests for their abuse of others nor embarrass Amber for her bigotry. But we can get some amount of pleasure by watching this clip of Amber getting her due over and over again (it’s worth the 10-second wait):

“Big Brother 8″ Thursday Live Eviction Edition Notches Best Viewer and Adult 25-54 Deliveries on any Night this Summer [CBS press release]

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.