On the Lot’s ratings improve slightly, but the show does not

Over the course of its first three episodes, FOX’s On the Lot lost about 3 million viewers per episode. Considering that just 2.9 million watched last week, that meant the show was on track to have a negative number of viewers this week.

However, the show actually rebounded slightly in its new Tuesday-only timeslot and format. An average of 3.1 million viewers watched, according to The Hollywood Reporter. That’s the same as last Monday’s peak, and a slightly higher average in terms of overall viewers.

Still, if this series didn’t have Mark Burnett and Steven Spielberg’s names in the credits, it would have been cancelled last week–and still should be. The format, by the way, wasn’t really all that different, and actually got worse.

Annoying Symmetrical Hand Gesture Host introduced each of the five filmmakers who presented films with a ridiculously drawn-out, faux-suspense moment: “Someone is going next. And that person is… [insert long, dramatic pause and pointless panning of contestant's pretend-horrified faces here, followed by a name of someone we don't really care about].” Or, “One more of you is coming up here to compete … and that person is….” bored, just like us.

Even the host acknowledged the show’s suckiness, although probably accidentally; pitching something for Ford in the final few moments, she said, “See how Ford can help you escape boredom — not from this show!” Nice attempt at a save, Adrianna, but watching someone vacuum linoleum is still far more interesting than watching Carrie Fisher pull Garry Marshall’s string so he can say, again and again, “we really need women filmmakers.”

NBC’s ‘Talent’ beats Tuesday competition [The Hollywood Reporter]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.