“Workaholic” Ryan Seacrest is “the well-scrubbed embodiment of the PG-rated American pop mainstream”

Ryan Seacrest, host of American Idol and so much more, “is ubiquitous and as instantly recognisable as the president — and, in some quarters, almost as fiercely derided,” according to a profile in The Guardian.

The paper’s John Patterson perfectly describes Seacrest as “the well-scrubbed embodiment of the PG-rated American pop mainstream” who “is also a carefully sculpted brand, each gig part of an overarching strategy to build his own TV and radio empire.” The profile makes Ryan both awe-inspiring and hateable.

Among the revelations offered about Ryan: He wakes up at 4 a.m. for his radio show, which he does from his “own in-house studio [that was built] to cut 90 minutes of drive-time from his minutely scheduled workday.” He doesn’t tape American Top 40 separately; instead, “[a]s songs play he busies himself doing filler announcements for American Top 40.” When American Idol is on the air, he’s at the studio only from 5 to 7 p.m.” Thus, “[b]y 8.30 he is usually in bed.”

Ryan describes himself as “accessible, self-deprecating and plugged in to pop culture. That’s the show I like to do, that’s the person I am and the person I like to be.” And he sees himself as part of “this multitasking, multimedia world that we live in. It used to be you’d work for one person and do one job, but my strategy has always been to try and put my tentacles into a lot of different things while delivering for everybody simultaneously, on all the platforms — TV, radio, the internet.”

His success is a result of the fact that he’s “a driven workaholic,” according to The Guardian. Seacrest says, “Failure? Scared to death of it. … Mine’s a pretty simple strategy: there’s not a lot of talent here, but there’s a lot of hustle. I have to be in every place I can, and be busy. And why wouldn’t I want to maximise this opportunity? It’d be crazy to be lazy.”

America’s Idol rich [The Guardian]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.