Kelly Clarkson: “I could give a crap about being a star”

Kelly Clarkson appears on the cover of Elle this month, and in the accompanying profile, the writer describes her preparing to “seduce the press with her unmitigated honesty.” She definitely seduces the rest of us, too, as she’s grounded and incredibly likable for someone who’s an international star.

“I could give a crap about being a star. I’ve always just wanted to sing and write,” Kelly said. “My resistance upsets a lot of people, because we could make a lot of money. And I’m not hatin’ on money. But you know in Funny Girl, when they make Barbra Streisand sing the ‘beautiful girl’ song, and she is singing these lyrics, and she knows she’s not that person? I’m just not comfortable doing things that don’t feel like me.”

What did not feel like her was promoting her new record on American Idol‘s Idol Gives Back event. “My label wanted me to sing ‘Never Again.’ And I was like, To promote yourself on a charity event is beyond crass. People are starving and dying and I’m up there singing some bitter pop song? And believe me, everyone wanted me to sing it. Because they are jaded and they have no soul. Imagine sitting in a room full of people totally against you. Can’t they hear themselves speaking? Capitalize on AIDS? Are you kidding? Insulting an entire nation of people? I just refused.”

Meanwhile, Kelly fired her management, although each party has kind words for the other. As to her new album, Kelly admits it’s a risk. “If I were to make Breakaway II, I would have failed myself. I don’t mind sucking, as long as it is my decision,” she said. “I have literally been told one of the reasons this record took so long to come together is because I am a girl. This is 2007! We aren’t in the ’50s anymore. Wake up and smell the Folgers.”

Rebel Yell [Elle]
Kelly Clarkson Parts Ways with Her Manager [People]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

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Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.