Road Rules Viewers’ Revenge gets put out of its misery tonight

Road Rules Viewers’ Revenge, the first new season since the series went on hiatus for two years, concludes tonight at 10:30 p.m. ET, an earlier-than-expected end to a season was actually revenge on viewers who wanted the show to return.

Perhaps as a way to encourage viewers to tune in tonight, host Drew Bell tells the cast in a preview, “During the past few weeks, there’s been a major rules violation” and promises a “shocking season finale.”

Please. If there’s been any shocking violation, it’s been with the show’s contract with viewers. Because the producers removed half of the viewer participation that’s supposed to be the entire point of this season, we’ve been left with little more than the show’s contrived, tired drama; lame-ass challenges; and product placement.

When they weren’t trying to kill their cast members with poorly conceived and executed challenges, producers were advertising Wendy’s, Ask.com, and even MTV’s web site. And with the cast allowed to vote the cast into the pit–instead of viewers, as was supposed to be the whole point of the series–we ended up with an alliance of obnoxiousness.

Specifically, Susie, Adam, and Kina developed an unnerving sense of entitlement and have spent the past few weeks creating specious arguments to use the others–particularly David–as a human shield for them in the pit.

Perhaps to their credit, they’ve been honest about what they’re doing and how they lack any kind of moral compass. Earlier this season, Susie told us, “I’m just going to feel like a jerk, but I’m voting for David and I’m going to get over my guilt whenever I get my check in the mail.”

I didn’t really have bad impressions of Adam and Susie before this season, but they’ve done everything possible to make themselves look like assholes who will do anything for a few thousand dollars and a car. If they do win the money and car, which looks likely, they’d better hope that there’s no such thing as karma.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.