Blake struggles, Jordin soars with moronic “This is My Now” ballad on Idol finale

The final performance night on American Idol 6 started with Ryan Seacrest calling Paula Abdul a “bitch” in front of millions of people and ended with the judges declaring that one of the two had pretty much wrapped up the competition.

As the live show opened, Ryan brought up Paula Abdul’s broken nose, and Paula said that both she and her dog were okay. “Tulip’s fine,” she revealed, and Ryan Seacrest immediately said, “So the bitch is okay; we got it.” Perhaps he was just trying to compete with Kathy Griffin, who was in the audience.

On to the actual singing: While Blake Lewis outperformed Jordin Sparks with his first song, Jordin “wiped the floor with Blake,” as Simon said, when they performed the awful ballad that won the songwriting contest. Although the contest was designed to avoid leaving the winner with an insipid ballad as their first single, that’s exactly what we got with “This is My Now.” Even the title makes me want to pop my eardrums.

The winners are “pastor Jeff Peabody and a member of his congregation, Scott Krippayne,” according to USA TODAY, which identifies Scott as “a rather prolific record maker.” The Seattle Times reports that he’s “a Christian music artist [who] has performed for about a decade and has seven albums.”

After that song particularly, but also the judges’ overall reactions, the world is predicting that Jordin will win, but I’ve convinced myself that Blake should win because the show “needs something to re-legitimize it as a true hitmaker” and he “is the finalist who can deliver on tour, on the radio, and in record stores without being a complete sell-out, manufactured, neutered Ken doll of a pop artist.” Plus, if everyone expects Jordin to win and thus were apathetic about voting for her, Blake could take the title.

The finals: Official summary and Following up on the ‘amateur’ songwriter [USA TODAY]
[Seattle Times]
Win for Blake would restore ‘Idol’ as hitmaker [MSNBC]

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.