Apprentice uses creative editing with disastrous L.A. Galaxy halftime show

Last summer, a soccer fan reported on a message board about an Apprentice 6 task that took place at an L.A. Galaxy game. The person wrote that the reception was so bad that producers would “have to do some really creative editing to show any of it and not make everyone look like fools (unless that was the intent).”

That prediction couldn’t have been more accurate. During Arrow’s presentation, the editors cut to the crowd members sitting still and looking dreadfully bored and annoyed. When the winning team, Kinetic, performed, the editors kept cutting to medium shots of audience members standing, cheering, and waving excitedly.

But when the crowd was visible in the background, it seemed to be exactly the opposite: no one was standing, waving, or cheering. The stands were half-empty, and those people that were there appeared to be sitting still. It was not an energized crowd.

Most likely, editors used shots of fans responding to the actual soccer game, not Kinetic’s skit, in order to reinforce Kinetic’s win. As to the audience’s vote for their favorite skit, that was entirely left out, probably because, as the report from last summer said, the audience “was so disgusted that they didn’t vote.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.