E! debuts Paradise City and third season of Girls Next Door; VH1 debuts Dice Undisputed

Two new but poorly reviewed reality series make their debut on cable tonight, while a third returns for a third season.

First, at 10, E! returns its Playboy-themed series The Girls Next Door for a third season. The show once again follows Holly Madison, Bridget Marquardt, and Kendra Wilkinson, Hugh Hefner’s three girlfriends.

At 10:30, E! debuts the Ryan Seacrest-produced reality series Paradise City, which is also produced by Go Go Luckey Productions, the people who created Laguna Beach. The show “offers a firsthand look at what it’s like to live, love and work in Las Vegas,” according to E!, following the lives of eight people. But those lives aren’t very interesting, according to the one critic who bothered to review it so far. The New York Post’s Linda Stasi says the show is “truly horrible” and gives it zero stars. Maybe Ryan should stick to hosting.

Over on VH1 debuts Andrew Dice Clay’s reality show, Dice Undisputed, at 10 with two back-to-back half-hour episodes. The show follows his attempt “to perform to a sell-out crowd in Giants Stadium,” according to the network. Besides the comedian, the show also includes his “posse of friends and road crew are a loveable band of misfits.” Critics don’t seem to think the show is all that lovable. The New York Daily News’ David Bianculli says the show has “more pathos than humor … and very little ‘reality’ that seems real rather than self-consciously staged,” while The New York Times’ Virginia Heffernan writes that Andrew Dice Clay, and likewise his show, is “charmless and unfunny.”

Paradise City and The Girls Next Door [E!]
Dice Undisputed [VH1]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.