American Inventor host, judges fired; George Foreman will judge second season

Following an often dull and drama-less first season, one that lost viewers as it progressed, American Inventor 2 will look significantly different.

First, all of the show’s judges–Ed Evangelista, Doug Hall, Mary Lou Quinlan–are all out, except for Peter Jones, who Variety notes is “also one of the show’s exec producers.” Stepping in as a judge will be George Foreman, known most recently as the George Foreman Grill’s celebrity endorser. Also judging will be “entrepreneur and former talkshow host Pat Croce and inventor Sara Blakely,” according to Variety.

The flat and lifeless host, Matt Gallant, has also been fired. He’s being replaced by a TV newsperson, Nick Smith.

In addition, the show has a new (are we sending a trend here?) executive producer, Clay Newbill, and a new format. “The first six weeks of “Inventor” will now take place on the road, as each week a finalist is chosen from one of six cities: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Orlando and Houston,” Variety says. “In week seven, a two-hour episode will follow the six finalists as they build their prototype invention and deliver it to the judges — who then whittle the contestants down to three. Then, with three left, viewers will pick their favorite invention. Winner will receive $1 million and a chance to mass produce their product.”

Foreman to judge on ‘Inventor’ [Variety]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.