Simon Cowell slams Antonella’s singing but says “I feel for you” about photos

As the women performed last night, American Idol 6 finally addressed the never-ending story about Antonella Barba’s photos, which now include her in a wet t-shirt and panties in the World War II Memorial in Washington.

After she performed, Simon Cowell basically told her that she was the worst female singer left in the competition. “You’ve gone as far as you can go, Antonella. I mean, the reality is, and I think you know this yourself, which is, you are surrounded by some pretty amazing girl singers. And I don’t know how much more you can do, to be honest with you, because I don’t think your voice is going to get any better,” he said.

But then, addressing the photos with her for the first time, said, “I feel for you, cause you’ve taken a lot of stick in the media. I think you’ve handled yourself well throughout, and I don’t think anyone should be put in that situation. But I’m not going to patronize you here. It wasn’t your worst, we’ve heard you sound worse, but I just have a problem here, which is I just wish you could sing better.”

During her chat with Ryan, she ignored those comments and instead became defensive about her comparative suckiness. “We’re all different, we’re all unique,” she said.

Meanwhile, Randy Jackson made a joke that pretty much implied Paula Abdul was giving him oral sex under the judges’ table. When the live show started, Ryan Seacrest said in his introduction, “And we don’t have Paula right now. We’ll find her, right?” But when it came time to introduce the judges, he said, “Paula Abdul has made it. We were worried.”

Simon said, “Under the desk,” and Randy added, “She had to get something for me.” Ryan replied, “Randy, Randy, it is a family show. Did I mention the show is live? Simon didn’t realize the show is live.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.