American Idol gets beaten by Grey’s Anatomy as ratings fall during semi-final round

American Idol continues to dominate in the ratings, beating its competition and remaining the number one show overall. But perhaps as a result of this season being a colossal bore, the ratings are slipping, and on Wednesday, were worse than they were on the same night last year. Last night, the show did not dominate its night for the first time this season.

For the men’s performances on Tuesday, 29.4 million viewers watched, according to The Hollywood Reporter. That “was down 10 percent from last week and at its lowest all season,” although “the current season is still tracking higher than last year’s” in total, TV Week reports.

On Wednesday night, the women’s performances were watched by “30.3 million viewers overall — up slightly over Tuesday night when the 12 male finalists performed but down some vs. the same night a year ago,” according to Variety. Of course, it still “crushed the competition.”

But it did not do so last night, at least not overall. While Grey’s Anatomy and American Idol 6 didn’t air at the same time, Grey’s was watched by more people. “It was the first show airing on the same night as ‘Idol’ this season to outdraw it in both 18-49s and total viewers,” Media Life reports.

In fact, only 24.2 million watched Idol‘s first results show, according to The Orlando Sentinel, three million less than watched Grey’s, and almost six million fewer viewers than watched Wednesday night. Again, it did win its timeslot, beating Survivor Fiji by more than 10 million viewers. American Idol is far from dying, but it’s definitely showing weakness.

First live ‘Idol’ dominates Tuesday [The Hollywood Reporter]
‘American Idol’ Hits Season-Low [TV Week]
Nothing challenges ‘Idol’ [Variety]

‘Grey’s’ in season high on cliffhanger [Media Life]
Top of Thursday? “Grey’s Anatomy,” not “Idol” [Orlando Sentinel]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.