Jeffrey Sebelia planned his challenge garments in advance, donated his car to charity

Project Runway 3 winner Jeffrey Sebelia says he planned all of the garments he made during the show beforehand.

In Elle, which features his spread this month, Jeffrey “claims, incredibly, that he plotted out ‘everything from the color palettes to the silhouettes’ in advance,” the magazine reports, quoting Jeffrey. “I decided to go dark and unconstructed with the first challenge, and then, as we went along, use a little more color or make it more precious,” he said.

He also reiterates his claim that he wanted to be the villain. “I knew I had to work the production and be entertaining. The easiest way to do that was just to let things fly out of my mouth,” he says.

That worked too well, Tim Gunn tells the magazine. “I got slammed with comments from people who said they wouldn’t wear him,” he said, “But, when pressed, it became clear that it was him they didn’t like, not his clothes.”

Unlike Jay McCarroll, Sebelia is accepting the show’s prizes. He’s u sing the $100,000 for his Cosa Nostra line, but in a very non-villain-like move, “he plans on donating the Saturn to MusiCares, the charity that paid his way through rehab,” Elle reports.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.