Kelly Clarkson says she’s working with NASCAR for free because “I have enough money”

International superstar and original American Idol Kelly Clarkson will make appearances for NASCAR and its foundation this racing season, but she’ll do so for free.

“I got on board, not even for a big paycheck or anything, just to help out. Just have fun and do some charity work with them,” she tells Access Hollywood.

Maria Menounos, fresh off of ignoring and asking obnoxious questions of Golden Globe winner American Ferrera, was appalled at that answer, and asked Kelly, “No paycheck?” Kelly said, “People do stuff for money all the time. I have enough money. It’s all about giving back as well.”

She’ll be “the official spokesperson for the fourth annual NASCAR Day on May 18, a day when fans of the sport are encouraged to make a charitable donation of $5 to the NASCAR Foundation in exchange for a commemorative lapel pin,” E! Online reports. That represents “the biggest and most comprehensive partnership the motorsports organization has ever forged with a recording artist.” Among other things, she will “[headline] the Nextel Tribute to America concert before the Daytona 500 on Feb. 18.”

Kelly Clarkson offers ‘Idol’ advice [Access Hollywood]
Kelly Clarkson, NASCAR Idol [E! Online]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.