Top Model 7 girls blame editing for anti-Melrose comments, Caridee’s run-in with Nigel

Normally, blaming the editing is a convenient way to get out of taking responsiblity for one’s behavior, but considering that the Top Model 7 story editors went on strike during production,

E! Online’s Kristin talked to several of the contestants this season and asked them about our perceptions. First, she reports that “Melrose is not nearly as hated as the show made her out to be.” Surprisingly, Kristin writes, Eugena and Melrose both “told me separately that they’re actually–hope you’re sitting down for this–friends.” In fact, Eugena says that many of her anti-Melrose remarks were taken out of context. “It’s funny to see the edited version, which was completely different than what we actually went through. I’d be watching the show and think, ‘I was talking about my dinner! Not Melrose!” she said.

Melrose, by the way, is glad CariDee won. “It was difficult at first, because I had put so much into it, but everything happens for a reason. Now, I’m free to do all the things I’m interested in, like designing and hopefully hosting. I want to hook up with Entertainment Tonight,” Melrose told Kristin. Now, she’s returned to her roots and “signed on to design clothes for [actor] Michelle [Rodriguez]‘s line, Ishkidada.”

Perhaps more interestingly, CariDee says that her smart-ass comment to Nigel wasn’t really a big deal. Instead, “It was edited dramatically for the suspense, I guess,” CariDee says. In fact, “Nigel actually joked back [when I said that to him].” That makes sense, considering how awkward the editing of that whole scene–and her subsequent scoldings from Tyra and Jay–were.

Top Model Aftermath: What You Didn’t See [E! Online]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.