American Idol 5 tour made $35.2 million

The American Idol 5 tour, which visited 55 cities in just under three months, earned $35.2 million, USA TODAY reports, citing numbers from Billboard Boxscore. The most anyone paid for a single ticket was $72.50, and still, that means it may “be among the top 10 [concert tours] of the year, even without the high ticket prices that Madonna and other top individual acts command,” according to USA TODAY.

A total of 645,782 screaming fans–or part screaming fans, part exasperated parents–attended the concerts. While slightly less than one-third of the shows (19) sold out completely, 96 percent of the seats were sold overall. USA TODAY’s Idol Chatter also highlights the cities that did the best and worst during the tour:

> Top-grossing show: New York (East Rutherford, N.J.), about $890,000 each for two shows, July 13 and 14
> Top attendance: Greensboro, N.C., 15,337, July 30
> Lowest percentage of seats sold: Austin, 80%, Sept. 10

Idol tour: The final scorecard [USA TODAY]

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.