Dancing with the Stars performances are pre-taped; the audience claps for an empty stage

The performances during the allegedly “live” Dancing with the Stars 3 performance episodes have been pre-recorded, Access Hollywood reports. The audience fakes its applause even though it’s just watched an empty stage, while the performers pretend to have just danced.

ABC’s web site repeatedly refers to “the live shows,” so learning that “the performances the last couple of weeks have been pre-taped,” as Access Hollywood reports, is somewhat surprising, particularly since just a portion of the show is pre-recorded.

Thus, “when Tom Bergeron and Samantha Harris throw to the stage there is no one there. The audience is then forced to give a standing ovation at the end of the song, even though nothing is happening right in front of them,” Laura Saltman reports.

The interview segments are apparently shot in front of the audience, however, but the contestants essentially lie and act like they just danced in order to convince us that they just danced, even though they danced at some other point.

Saltman writes, “Remember after the Paso Doble performance when Samantha was interviewing Willa, Vivica Fox and Sara Evans backstage and the boys all of a sudden showed up to join their dance partners like they had just gotten off the dance floor? They didn’t. They were in the backstage room the whole time. I loved how they tried to play it off like they were out of breath! They weren’t. Fakers!”

Dish Of Salt: Harry’s Last Tango [Access Hollywood]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.