Heather wins Hell’s Kitchen 2

After two hours of editors doing their best to convince us that Virginia was on the verge of winning Hell’s Kitchen 2, Heather was declared the winner. She won the title of executive chef of and “financial interest in” the T-Bones Chophouse & Lounge at the Red Rock Casino and Resort, which describes the restaurant as “a meat-lover’s mecca.”

Speaking of, the two-hour finale also offered plenty of time for more footage of Heather and eliminated contestant Rachel hugging and talking about how much they missed each other; if the editors were going for lesbian subtext, they need to look up “subtext.” Then again, it’s not like they’re shy about contestants who are gay, so why the ambiguity?

Perhaps because it wasn’t a very friendly environment for women, regardless of one’s sexual orientation. Virginia picked a team that she described–to them, the moron–as the weak links, hoping she’d look good when she was able to manage them. Instead, she ended up with some good old misogyny from one of her team members, and not even the one member (Keith) who had just accused Gordon Ramsay of being horny for Virginia. The other, Tom, told us, “I can take all the shit from a man, but I don’t like being bossed around by a woman. It’s like listening to my ex-girlfriend.” (Gee, Tom, you gross, sweaty piece of shit, I wonder why that woman is your ex.) A few moments after we saw him say that, Tom cut his hand open, perhaps because God has a great sense of humor, or is an ex-girlfriend herself.

And speaking of exes, before they ran their own pseudo-restaurant for an evening, Virginia and Heather had to face the “press” at a “press conference.” I’m using scare quotes because, besides , the only “journalist” to mention his name and network was Road Rules cast member Mark Long, who was representing Fox Reality as their “correspondent.” Nice little ad for Fox Reality in prime-time there.

Anyway, Heather will undoubtedly have a happy career at the Red Rock, unless she makes a “tuff decision” and rejects the prize like last year’s winner did.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.