Janelle nominated by but allied with Chill Town; fights with James but wins the veto

Toward the beginning of last night’s Big Brother 6 episode, Mike Boogie explained what happened with the coup d’etat power. By that, I mean, he recited something that sounded as if he’d been told what to say. “The first two [evictions] I elected not to use it, and now I’m head of household, so the coup d’etat power is now no longer part of the game,” he said, thereby confirming that the live show will never deal with whether or not he lost the power because he violated the rules by talking about it.

Meanwhile, with Howie gone, Janelle was devastated. Or at least, that’s how she acted, crying and curling herself into a ball. But as she told us, “I want to appear weak, I want to appear emotional, and I want to appear like I don’t have any fight left in me when I actually do. Of course it’s strategy.”

James didn’t buy it, but Will did, sort of. He said that Janelle is “a phenomenal competitor, she’s a warrior. And what I want to do is take her form this dark spot she’s at right now, and I want to rebuild her faster, stronger, and more loyal, and have her attack James for me.”

As part of that strategy, Boogie and Will decided to nominate Janelle and James, and help Janelle win the veto, which no one would expect. “It is absolutely imperative that Janelle remains in this house,” Will said. “Why? She’s a much bigger target than Chill Town. … We have to keep her here, even if she’s not on our side, just so that the others will chase her down.”

That’s a smart play, and if the guy makes it to the final two, he probably deserves to win, even against Janelle. Then again, maybe not: Janelle remained suspicious, saying that Chill Town was her number one target: “I’m going after them.” Game on.

Before the veto competition, Janelle announced, “I’m ready to get nominated, win the power of veto, shove it up their asses.” She did that, although without the ass-shoving part, and with some controversy. During the competition, which took place on a quasi-Survivor set, and which Janelle compared to musical chairs and duck-duck-goose, James and Janelle fought over a small doll.

In the diary room, James whined, “She took the doll out of my hand, physically assaulted me. … This bitch took the doll out of my hand. Intentionally removing the doll from my hand is physically described as assault in the outside world.”

While he was nursing his boo-boo, the editors showed us a replay of the moment, which showed that they fought over the wrong doll; Janelle then grabbed for the correct one and got away before James got close to it. Will, who threw the competition to help Janelle win, said, “James thinks the show is fixed in Janelle’s favor. Well, it is. I’m the one fixing it in Janelle’s favor, James,” he said, taking a bit too much credit.

After Janelle saved herself with the veto, Mike Boogie nominated Chicken George, and James was fine with that decision. “There is not a scenario that does not play out good for me,” James said, unaware that he’ll probably be talking to Julie Chen on Thursday.

Speaking of being evicted, after my post Monday about the Boogie/Howie confrontation, I heard from someone identifying themselves only as an “anonymous producer.” I’m sort of gratified to know that, of all the bitching I’ve done about this season (regarding lazy producers, drunk interns designing challenges, et cetera), the only thing that prompted a reply was something Mike Boogie said in anger. The alleged producer wrote:

“I know you think it’s really funny to make fun of how poorly run you think reality TV is, but unlike you, Mike Boogie has walked out of the door of the Big Brother house before. His “there are twenty people out there” comment is a lot closer to the truth than your non-joke about an intern posing as security. Why do you insist on pretending to be an expert on a process you so obviously know next to nothing about? It’s embarassing to watch.”

I could make a joke about it being embarrassing not knowing how to spell embarrassing, but instead I’ll admit that I have never been evicted from the Big Brother house, so Mike Boogie is definitely more of an expert on that than I am. Thus, I apologize if I offended the show’s massive security crew. From now on, I’ll take Boogie’s word for everything about the show, because we all know how trustworthy and honest he is.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.