Top Model 7 story writers go on strike

Story writers working on America’s Next Top Model 7 have gone on strike. They are “alleging that the show’s producers had snubbed their request to join the Writers Guild of America, West,” according to the Los Angeles Times.

In a statement, the writers said, “There is a double standard being applied, as our peers in dramatic television work under the protections of a WGA contract.” As Variety reports, “The CW had responded by asserting that the writers and the WGA should take the issue to the National Labor Relations Board so that the federal agency could then conduct an election — a step that would take many months to complete.”

As of Thursday, “[o]nly the first few episodes have been completed for the series’ seventh cycle,” although the show will debut in less than two months and will be the new network’s first show. The CW said in a statement, “We expect these issues to be resolved in the near future, and the show remains on track for its Sept. 20 launch on the CW.”

Last Thursday, the writers left their jobs for one hour to protest their lack of unionization. The “low-key protest,” as the LA Times called it, was part of the Writers Guild of America, West’s campaign for unionization of reality TV writers. Last year, they sued networks and producers and protested at conferences.

‘Top Model’ Writers Strike Over Union Bid and ‘Next Top Model’ Writers Threaten Strike [Los Angeles Times]
‘Model’ scribes walk strike runway [Variety]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.