George saves himself with the veto after shaving his head, giving up real food

Finally: Big Brother 7 got exciting. And unbelievably, Chicken George was the catalyst. The crazy bastard won the power of veto and saved himself, and what happened after that was a full-scale implosion.

The veto challenge started by having the competitors burn their clothes, get written on with markers, and dye themselves blue–challenges clearly designed and practiced by drunk interns. But the last two tasks were intriguing: First, the remaining competitors had to agree to sit out the next veto. That left just Kaysar and George, who next had to agree to shave their heads. (Someone watched The Amazing Race!)

Both did, despite Marcellas’ protests about Kaysar losing his hair. Earlier, we were treated to an entire segment about the crush he has on Kaysar. Marcellas even said that when he noticed Kaysar “actually kind of stank” one day, “I was trying to catch the smell in my nose so I could sort of keep it forever. That smell is better than banana cupcakes.”

The tiebreaker asked Kaysar and George how many of the remaining 60 days they’d be willing to eat slop oatmeal. George went for all 60 days, and won the veto, which he used to save himself.

As a result, HOH James had to nominate someone new, and that person was Jase, who the BB6 alliance agreed was a threat–more of a threat, apparently, than the Chill Town alliance. When Jase found out about this, he stormed into the back yard, where everyone was gathered while waiting for the veto ceremony.

“I love getting back-doored,” Jase said, shortly before he began throwing things around in anger. He called it “the bitch route,” primarily because he’d made a pact with James to get rid of the weak players so they could go head-to-head as strong players. Jase, who really needs to stop wearing sleeveless shirts or get deodorant that doesn’t turn his armpits white, called himself a “true competitor of the game.” He used his mad skillz to try to turn the group, and James, against Marcellas, who started shouting and said Jase is “trying to throw me under the bus” as a “last-ditch effort.”

For his part, James was ridiculously angry that he had to nominate someone else besides non-threatening simpleton George. “Everything I have worked for is now down the drain; I’m busting my ass in here,” he said. If only James knew what it was like to nominate someone week after week after week, only to have that person save themselves with the veto. Oh, irony.

As all of this went down, Will sat quietly, ate a sandwich, and smiled. The fucker is going to win again–perhaps because of the speech he gave at the veto ceremony. Knowing the group was much more likely to vote out Jase, Will went on a tirade, first explaining that he was motivated during season two by the fact that he disliked some people in the house. He then wondered why he wasn’t motivated this season, saying,

“I thought it was because I really like everyone here. I can’t find an individual to hate, because I hate you all. I’m going to ask to be removed from this game by you all. Now, if you refuse to kick me out, I will be throwing every competition, I will throw every HOH, I will throw every POV, and I will throw every food competition. George is on slop, and I will do the best I can to ensure that we all are on slop, unless you get together, have a big group meeting, and vote me out.”

Although the houseguests laughed and smirked while he talked, Will told us later, “I have made the target on my back so giant that it’s become invisible.” And it’s hard not to see how smart he actually is, because he will likely survive this nomination and then coast for weeks.

After Will ranted, George gave a stirring speech about second chances, saying “I’m just honored to be with each and every one of you. You are all-stars, you are all-stars at something in life.” Then he saved himself and kept his chicken ass in the game for at least one more week. If only he could be this interesting all the time.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.