Katharine McPhee misses Pittsburgh concert after performing on The View

Katharine McPhee missed yet another stop on the American Idol 5 tour, missing the Thursday evening concert in Pittsburgh. Signs posted at the venue noted that Katharine would not be performing.

Even though Katharine sang live on The View just hours earlier, her absence was apparently unrelated to her recent illness. The moderator of a fan site, KatharineFans.com, posted that “her flight was delayed because of severe weather.” However, there’s raging debate on the show’s message boards (I had nightmares just from reading those posts) about whether or not there was bad weather in New York and/or Pittsburgh, and whether or not little children in Pittsburgh have had their lives ruined because Katharine did not sing to them.

Despite the fact that Katharine was definitely a no-show, the AP reports this morning that “McPhee rejoined the group Thursday in Pittsburgh after missing a string of recent performances,” even though she most definitely did not. Then again, the story was written by Nedra Pickler, a reported who wrote about politics during the 2002 campaign and was known for being inaccurate. Even covering American Idol, she apparently just makes shit up.

Just hours before the Pittsburgh concert, the world welcomed Katharine McPhee back with open arms, as she recovered from illness to rejoin the tour. E! Online said that “American Idol’s runner-up is finally up and running,” while an earlier AP article said she had “proved that her vocal cords are better” on The View.

If she did indeed just miss a flight, that’s pretty horrible luck. Her fans one one message board are encouraging each other to persevere and, as one wrote, “Keep the McPhaith guys.” Anti-runner-up backlash helping to solidify fervent, unwavering, blind support for that person? Where have we seen this before?

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.