Hell’s Kitchen 2’s ratings increase; Ramsay wins libel suit over claims his other show was faked

Hell’s Kitchen 2 is looking to be the first reality hit of this summer. The series debuted with an average of 6.7 million viewers last week, roughly the same as last year, but was watched by an average of 7.4 million viewers Monday night, a significant increase.

Meanwhile, Hell’s Kitchen star Gordon Ramsay was awarded $138,000 in damages by a UK court from The Evening Standard. The newspaper “claimed in November that parts of Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares — in which Ramsay helps save failing restaurants — had been exaggerated to make an average restaurant look like a health hazard,” the AP reports. The paper also “claimed the program had put an incompetent chef into place at” a restaurant that “was featured in one episode.”

Ramsay said, “I won’t let people write anything they want to about me. Even I have limits and on this occasion the line was crossed. I am satisfied with today’s apology and am looking forward to future series of ‘Kitchen Nightmares.'”

Covering reality television in a country where libel is much easier to prove must be a lot more difficult. For one, I might not be able to just call reality TV whores that unless I’d actually offered them money in exchange for something. Nor could one be, I imagine, an asshat TV critic who makes unsubtantiated claims about the veracity of a reality TV show.

Fox wins 18-49 Mon. with ‘Kitchen’ help [Hollywood Reporter]
Ramsey wins libel damages over fakery claims [AP]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.