WE orders Dirty Dancing reality show; Oxygen plans Bad Girls Club

Two female-focused cable networks have ordered new reality series. WE has ordered a show based on Dirty Dancing, while Oxygen will help “bad girls” change their ways.

Oxygen has ordered a series from venerable reality producers Bunim-Murray called The Bad Girls Club. The show, which will also debut in December, “features a group of purported bad girls who will live together after making a pledge to, as the press release puts it, ‘change their evil ways,’” TV Week reports. If that sounds like its cast could come straight from MTV, it’s for good reason.

Jon Murray basically admits that the idea came from the string of badly behaving women to appear on his company’s other shows, such as The Real World. “With all the reality shows that we have produced, there has been a never-ending fascination with the ‘bad girls’ in each cast. Since the audience loves them and loves to hate them, we thought it would be perfect to devote an entire series to them, to see how they interact with each other and if it’s really possible for them to change their ways,” he said.

Meanwhile, WE’s Dirty Dancing: Living the Dream, which will also debut in December, “puts 30 young women under the instruction of six male dancing instructors at a resort,” according to TV Week. They’ll compete to perform in a stage show based upon the movie.

WE Picks Up ‘Dirty Dancing’ Reality Show and Oxygen Adds ‘Bad Girls Club’ [TV Week]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.