Chris Daughtry turns down Fuel’s offer; Cruise, Holmes want Kat to sing at their wedding

First Fuel was rumored to want American Idol 5 finalist Chris Daughtry as their lead singer. Then they made a formal offer. Then he performed with Live on the show’s finale. And now he’s turned down Fuel.

“I’m going to be doing my own thing,” Chris told the Charlotte Observer at his homecoming celebration. He “expects to announce his next career move in a few months, probably after the ‘American Idol concert tour ends this summer,” the paper reports. Apparently, he’s convinced that something better will come along, like a life in obscurity as a American Idol loser. Quick: Name the person who came in fourth place any other season. See?

Meanwhile, runner-up Katharine McPhee has a much better offer. She’s already been offered the most amazing deal ever by KFC, but now Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes apparently want her to sing at their wedding. They’re fans, according to an anonymously sourced World Entertainment News Network report. I’d joke about a manufactured pop star performing at a manufactured wedding, but that’d be unfair to Katharine, who’d be the only one bringing something genuine to that event.

Daughtry turns down opportunity to front Fuel [Charlotte Observer]
Cruise and Holmes Want McPhee to Sing at Their Wedding [World Entertainment News Network]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.