Survivor Vanuatu winner Chris Daugherty may lose his job for lying to get time off

Once they win Survivor, some people just can’t stop lying. Richard Hatch is in prison after being convicted of lying, and now Survivor Vanuatu winner Chris Daughtery may lose his job as an Ohio highway worker for lying to his supervisors about a show-related trip he took.

Chris, who lied his way to victory on the show, “was [found] guilty of taking the unauthorized leave and of dishonesty for falsely claiming that he needed time off work because he was under stress and suffering from depression” by the Ohio Department of Transportation, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Chris was “denied a leave because he had used all but 29 hours of his vacation, sick leave and personal leave, [and then] Daugherty submitted a bogus excuse from a doctor in London, Ohio, that said he needed to take off a month because he was suffering from anxiety and depression.”

Then he went to Germany and Italy for two weeks as part of a Survivor-related tour, for which he received $8,000. He told investigators he went “because my doctor thought it’d be good for me to relax and get away. It was recommended.” But the chief Ohio DOT investigator says “Daugherty’s claim that he had an illness which just happened’ to coincide with his Survivor’ tour is simply not credible.”

The paper notes that Chris “was obligated to attend [the trip] under a contractual agreement with CBS.” However, it doesn’t say why he still had a $34,000 a year job “patching potholes, mowing and picking up litter” after winning $1 million.

‘Survivor’ in trouble at work [Cleveland Plain Dealer]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.