Janusz Liberkowski wins American Inventor

Janusz Liberkowski won American Inventor last night, taking the $1 million prize for his spherical safety seat named after his daughter, Anecia.

But everyone else didn’t go away crushed. Representatives from product-placed companies showed up to offer to help develop the products of the runners-up–except for Erik Thompson. Apparently no company thought The Catch was worthwhile, so instead producers brought ABC’s Dancing with the Stars participant Jerry Rice on to congratulate Erik.

Rarely has there been a show that started so strongly and ended so anticlimactically. Incredibly, producers took a brilliant concept and managed to completely fuck it up by not trusting their format and deciding instead to “tell stories” rather than just letting the stories unfold. They also screwed up basically every genuine moment by being heavy-handed and trying to manipulate viewers into responding emotionally.

The finale was even more pathetically fumbled than last week’s waste of time. For example, after the winner was announced, they pushed him aside to drag out a company rep to deal with the runner-up for a few minutes. And before that, excuse-for-a-host Matt Gallant announced the winner by saying, “The winner of American Inventor 2006 is…” Then he waited 12 excruciatingly awkward, silent seconds before saying Janusz’s name. Twelve. Any show that can make one appreciate Ryan Seacrest’s talent is definitely a disaster.

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.