Janusz Liberkowski wins American Inventor

Janusz Liberkowski won American Inventor last night, taking the $1 million prize for his spherical safety seat named after his daughter, Anecia.

But everyone else didn’t go away crushed. Representatives from product-placed companies showed up to offer to help develop the products of the runners-up–except for Erik Thompson. Apparently no company thought The Catch was worthwhile, so instead producers brought ABC’s Dancing with the Stars participant Jerry Rice on to congratulate Erik.

Rarely has there been a show that started so strongly and ended so anticlimactically. Incredibly, producers took a brilliant concept and managed to completely fuck it up by not trusting their format and deciding instead to “tell stories” rather than just letting the stories unfold. They also screwed up basically every genuine moment by being heavy-handed and trying to manipulate viewers into responding emotionally.

The finale was even more pathetically fumbled than last week’s waste of time. For example, after the winner was announced, they pushed him aside to drag out a company rep to deal with the runner-up for a few minutes. And before that, excuse-for-a-host Matt Gallant announced the winner by saying, “The winner of American Inventor 2006 is…” Then he waited 12 excruciatingly awkward, silent seconds before saying Janusz’s name. Twelve. Any show that can make one appreciate Ryan Seacrest’s talent is definitely a disaster.

Survivor San Juan Del Sur's dark cloud is lifted

John Rocker

In its third episode, Survivor San Juan Del Sur improved significantly as John Rocker faced off against an Amazing Race villain. But the Exile Island reward challenge remains a drag on the series.


Why Dick Donato left Big Brother 13

Dick Donato

The Big Brother villain known as "Evel Dick" has finally revealed why he left the show during its 13th season: he learned he was HIV positive.

Also: Dick claims he had no choice but to leave the game.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.