What would you ask Donald Trump?

Tomorrow, Donald Trump and his daughter Ivanka, who will appear as a Carolyn sub on The Apprentice 5, will conduct a telephone press conference with reporters. I, for one, wouldn’t miss that to watch the Weavers face judgement.

On these calls, reporters typically ask these TV celebrities brilliant questions like, “What’s your favorite color?” Basically, they don’t do much to conceal the fact that they’re starstruck and/or incapable of connecting with the stars as viewers of their shows. While the one or two questions I have for Trump aren’t inane, there are things I’m sure I haven’t thought to ask.

So: What are you dying to ask Donald Trump?

I don’t promise to actually ask any submitted questions, especially the ridiculously funny ones, because I am not Stuttering John. (As was evident in my interview with Jonathan and Victoria, I’m about as confrontational as a paranoid squirrel.) But hopefully they’ll be funny enough to reprint, and if they’re good enough, maybe we’ll get some information from him. Like, why does The Donald insist upon calling Lenny “The Russian”?

While I play trivia aboard a Song flight to LA later today, send in your suggested questions, and I promise to at least consider asking them. And I’ll report back after the call on Friday.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.