Rock Star 2 will form a new group with “members from existing or defunct bands”

The identity of the Rock Star 2 group has been revealed, sort of. Executive producer Mark Burnett told the London Free Press that the group will not be a name band such as Van Halen. Instead, as the paper reports, it “will be a brand new group comprised of members from existing or defunct bands.” Those exact people will be revealed later this week.

This news explains last week’s rumor that Tommy Lee is participating in the show, perhaps as the new group’s drummer. And that also one of the possible directions the show would take in its second season.

Burnett said this format will be even better than the previous season’s. “Last year was the year to prove ourselves and the integrity that we stood for to the rock community. We’re gonna really, really grow this year,” he said. He said the delay in announcing the group is because everyone has to sign “very complicated agreements. You have a TV agreement, record agreement, a tour agreement, and there are a few people in the band.”

The show is currently casting; potential lead singers “were only told judges were open to hearing a range of singing styles, giving as examples John Mayer, Chester of Linkin Park, Joss Stone and Amy Lee of Evanescence,” the paper reports.

Rock Star hopefuls shake off cold rain [London Free Press]

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.