Trump slams Martha in a letter: “your performance was terrible”

The exchange of unpleasentries between Donald Trump and Martha Stewart has erupted into a full-fledged war. The latest blow: Trump wrote Martha a letter in which he eviscerates both her and her shows.

Trump shared the letter with Newsweek, which also interviewed him. Among other things, his comments show that he still persists under the delusion that his show is number one, when it is nowhere close to that. “What moron would think you’d fire a guy with the No. 1 show on TV?” Trump said, completely denying that he was ever going to be replaced, when Mark Burnett “confirmed” to Newsweek that was indeed discussed.

Before we get to Trump’s letter, here’s part of Martha’s reply:

“The letter is so mean-spirited and reckless that I almost can’t believe my long-time friend Donald Trump wrote it. I am very proud of the work we did with Mark Burnett Productions and Mr. Trump, who was an executive producer, on ‘The Apprentice: Martha Stewart.’ Many young entrepreneurs learned so much from the show and enjoyed it. Many families sat their children down weekly to watch it.”

So what was “so mean-spirited and reckless”? Newsweek doesn’t reproduce the whole letter in block form, but instead excerpts parts in its text. Here are those parts made whole, with ellipses marking Newsweek’s breaks. (Update: People has published the full letter.) Be prepared, because Trump really loses it:

“It’s about time you started taking responsibility for your failed version of “The Apprentice”. … Your performance was terrible in that the show lacked mood, temperament and just about everything else a show needs for success. I knew it would fail as soon as I first saw it–and your low ratings bore me out. … Between your daughter, with her-one word statements, your letter writing and, most importantly, your totally unconvincing demeanor, it never had a chance–much as your daytime show is not exactly setting records. … You made this firing up just as you made up your sell order of ImClone. The only difference is–that was more obvious. I did nothing but positively promote you. My great loyalty to you has gone totally unappreciated. … P.S. Be careful or I will do a syndicated daytime show, perhaps called The Boardroom, and further destroy the meager ratings you already have.”

Donald to Martha: Your ‘Apprentice’ Was Terrible [Newsweek]
Trump Skewers Stewart in Open Letter [People]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.